Trying to Teach

As Mark previous mentioned in our Summer Is Here blog, I thought I’d write a little update about my process of looking for a job.

gtc247_380When Mark and I were preparing for this journey across the Atlantic, we had decided that I would take a year off of working to help situate our kids into our new life in Scotland, all while applying for registration with the General Teaching Council of Scotland (GTCS), with the hope of being registered and ready to teach/supply teach (substitute teach) by fall of 2016. Well, the registration process with GTCS has been anything but speedy!

To sum up this process, let me just say that hindsight is 20/20, and if I could go back and start things sooner, I would! But, for now, I live in the present and have to wait.

So let me now explain my process (with the hope that this post might help some other California teacher pursue teaching in Scotland!)

Substitute/Supply Teaching

Unlike in California, in order to substitute teach (or supply teach, as they call it in the UK), you have to be fully certified and registered with GTCS. In CA, all you need to substitute teach is 90 semester units at university under your belt and to pass a test (called the CBEST). However, due to the amazing maternity benefits this country offers, many supply positions are long-term jobs, sometimes upwards of a year; so, it makes sense that they want supply teachers to be highly qualified. Unfortunately for me, this means that substitute teaching is not an option until I complete registration.

Registration Process

I started filling out my registration paperwork in December 2015. All was going well until I hit the part of the paperwork that required a police certificate from my country. Although I am cleared to work full time in the UK through my visa, GTCS needed this certificate, which required me to get finger printed and all my info sent into the United States FBI. My first issue with this step was that there is literally only ONE person in all of Edinburgh (the capital of the country mind you) that does official fingerprints, and he lives about a 45 min bus ride away. So after setting up my appointment, getting finger printed, and mailing in my prints, the wait time with the FBI was estimated to be 13-15 weeks! Needless to say, I got my police certificate back in April 2016! Hindsight: If only I would have done this before we left the states; (1) it would’ve been a lot cheaper (it cost me £70 – roughly $100) to get my prints done, and (2) I could’ve submitted my completed application much sooner.

So, with my fingerprints in hand, I officially submitted my application to GTCS in April! However, a week later part of my application was returned because they needed more information…

In Scotland the grade levels are labeled a bit different from CA. For example, when Penelope started school this past year in October 2015 she was 5 years old and she started P1 (primary 1), which is equivalent to Kindergarten in the states.   This school year she is in P2 (primary 2), which would be labeled as 1st grade in the states. There is also no “middle school” or “junior high” here. There is only two school levels – primary and secondary/high school. Things get a lot more confusing when it comes to labeling levels in secondary school, and I’m still trying to figure it out, so we will just leave that conversation for another day.

In California I have a K-12 Multiple Subject Credential, but that label does not necessarily translate in terms that are relevant to the Scots system, so GTCS asked me to get a formal letter from my university explaining in detail what ages, not grades levels, I am certified to teach and the details on the subject matters in which I am qualified. The letter took a few weeks to get completed after a few timed out conversations with my university and GTCS (which I am incredibly grateful to the time and effort made by National University’s credential office!), and I have to say, that after reading the details of the letter from NU, I was pleasantly surprised to see all that I was qualified to teach!

So where am I at in the process now, you may be asking?

After submitting all of the new information from NU, I was finally contacted that my application was under review on 19 Aug! However, although I was ecstatic to receive this email, with the email came more requests for information. The council informed me that although I have a teaching “credential” from the state of California, they are more concerned with the course work that I studied and not the certificates that I have earned…which I completely understand. So they requested detailed course descriptions and syllabi of some of my specific courses. Again, National University pulled through for me! After multiple phone calls, conference calls, and working with various departments and professors, I sent off the official letters to GTCS this morning (5 Sept)!

So the waiting resumes…

But in the mean time what are we going to do to generate income?

Because our timeline has been prolonged, I have not been able to jump into the teaching game as soon as we had hoped. We budgeted for my year off of work, but our first year abroad has come to a close (12 Sept). So, while I have been waiting and working with GTCS, I have also been tirelessly pursing a job that does not require registration (this effort deserves a blog of it’s own!); however, I am happy to announce that I was offered a position as a School Support Assistant at Broughton High School. This job entails working 34 hours a week in a variety of areas within the school: reception, attendance, administration, welfare (first aid), helping students and parents, and anything the staff needs. Although this is not a teaching post, I am very excited to be in a school, working around staff and students, and getting to know the school system a bit better. I have also been afforded a tutoring opportunity with Kip McGrath, a private tutoring company that focuses on math and English. As of right now I am tutoring a class of my own on Wednesdays and covering other classes as needed.

Because Mark has a some-what flexible study schedule, he will be able to walk the kids to and from school and take care of Markie during the day after he is finished with nursery. We are still trying to work out all the logistics, but we are feeling hopeful. Our needs are being provided for, and I am on my way to being able to teach in Scotland.

Image result for broughton high school edinburgh